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Chemistry (CHM) 

CHM-101: 

Introduction to General, Organic, and Biochemistry 

3 credits 

An introduction to the principles of chemistry; designed for students without a strong background in science. Topics covered include a survey of the chemical and physical properties of elements and compounds, chemical reactions, chemical energetics, acids and bases, and chemical bonding. An introduction to organic and biochemistry emphasizes the relationship between molecular structure and function. Co-requisite: CHM-101L. 

CHM-101L: 

Introduction to General, Organic, and Biochemistry Lab 

1 credits 

This lab course is designed to compliment and support the principles being addressed in CHM-101. Students learn basic lab techniques related to general and organic chemistry, building upon and strengthening foundational knowledge such as stoichiometry and reaction types. Additionally, some topics are addressed from a biochemical standpoint to highlight application to daily living. Co-requisite: CHM-101. 

CHM-113: 

General Chemistry I-Lecture 

3 credits 

This is the first course of a two-semester introduction to chemistry intended for undergraduates pursuing careers in the health professions and others desiring a firm foundation in chemistry. The course assumes no prior knowledge of chemistry and begins with basic concepts. Topics include an introduction to the scientific method, dimensional analysis, atomic structure, nomenclature, stoichiometry and chemical reactions, the gas laws, thermodynamics, chemical bonding, and properties of solutions. Co-Requisite: CHM-113L. 

CHM-113L: 

General Chemistry I – Lab 

1 credits 

The laboratory section of CHM-113 reinforces and expands learning of principles introduced in the lecture course. Experiments include determination of density, classification of chemical reactions, the gas laws, determination of enthalpy change using calorimetry, and determination of empirical formula. Co-Requisite: CHM-113. 

CHM-115: 

General Chemistry II-Lecture 

3 credits 

This is the second course of a two-semester introduction to chemistry intended for undergraduates pursuing careers in the health professions and others desiring a firm foundation in chemistry. Upon successful completion of this course, students demonstrate knowledge and/or skill in solving problems involving the principles of chemical kinetics, chemical equilibrium, and thermodynamics; understanding chemical reactions using kinetics, equilibrium, and thermodynamics; comparing and contrasting the principal theories of acids and bases; solving equilibrium involving acids, bases, and buffers; describing solubility equilibrium; describing terms associated with electrochemistry and solving problems associated with electrochemistry; and describing fundamentals and applications of nuclear chemistry and organic chemistry. Prerequisites: CHM-113 and MAT-154 or higher. Co-Requisite: CHM-115L. 

 

CHM-115L: 

General Chemistry II – Lab 

1 credits 

The laboratory section of CHM-115 reinforces and expands learning of principles introduced in the lecture course. Experiments include determination of rate law, examples of Le Châtelier’s principle, the use of pH indicators, buffer preparation, experimental determination of thermodynamic quantities, the use of electrochemical cells, and qualitative and quantitative analysis. Prerequisites: CHM-113L and MAT-154 or higher. Co-Requisite: CHM-115. 

CHM-231: 

Organic Chemistry I 

3 credits 

This course is the first of two organic chemistry courses. The first half of this course develops the vocabulary and concepts of chemical bonding, chemical structure, acid-base principles, and nomenclature needed to understand properties and reactions of organic compounds. The second half of this course discusses chemical reactions, including radical reactions, substitution and elimination reactions, and synthesis and reactions of alkenes. Students learn how to predict reaction products and draw reaction mechanisms. Organic synthesis and structural determination are also covered. Instruction includes lecture and in-class problem solving. Prerequisites: CHM-115 and CHM-115L. Co-requisite: CHM-231L. 

CHM-231L: 

Organic Chemistry I Lab 

1 credits 

The laboratory section of CHM-231 reinforces principles learned in the lecture course through various techniques that organic chemists use to synthesize compounds. Students use these techniques throughout the semester. These techniques include determination of melting point, determination of solubility, thin layer chromatography, recrystallization, and distillation. Structural determination using theories discussed in CHM-231 is applied to unknown compounds. Prerequisites: CHM-115 and CHM-115L. Co-requisite: CHM-231. 

CHM-232: 

Organic Chemistry II 

3 credits 

This course is the second of two organic chemistry courses. The course is organized by common organic functional groups, including alkynes, alcohols, ether, aromatic compounds, ketones and aldehydes, amines, carboxylic acid, and carboxylic acid derivatives. The reactions and properties of each functional group are discussed. Students learn how to predict reaction products, draw reaction mechanisms, and predict physical properties. Instruction includes lecture and in-class problem solving. The final assignment for the course is a paper that describes the synthesis of a popular pharmaceutical agent. Prerequisites: CHM-231 and CHM-231L. Co-requisite: CHM-232L. 

CHM-232L: 

Organic Chemistry II Lab 

1 credits 

The laboratory section of CHM-232 supports and extends principles learned in the lecture course. Students carry out various organic syntheses using techniques taught in CHM-231. The experiments include preparation of an alkene from an alcohol, a Grignard reaction, preparation of cinnamaldehyde, nitration of methyl benzoate, synthesis of N-Methyl Prozac, an Aldol reaction, Benzimidizole synthesis, and a Diazonium coupling reaction. Prerequisites: CHM-231 and CHM-231L. Co-requisite: CHM-232. 

 

CHM-235: 

Survey of Organic Chemistry 

3 credits 

This course is a survey of basic structure and reactivity of carbon-containing structures with examples in biological and industrial processes. Students will learn how to name organic compounds, draw and understand their structures in two and three dimensions, and learn how structure and reactivity are interrelated. Students will be able to describe reactivity in terms of addition, elimination, and substitution. Biological compounds discussed in the course include the structure and reactivity of carbohydrates and polysaccharides followed by amino acids and proteins. The final topic for the course is a discussion about industrially important polymers. Prerequisites: MAT-261, CHM-115, and CHM-115L. Co-Requisite: CHM-235L. 

CHM-235L: 

Survey of Organic Chemistry Lab 

1 credits 

This is the lab section of CHM-235. It supports the lecture with hands-on activities. Lab experiments expand students’ understanding of organic compounds, drawing and understanding their structures in two and three dimensions, and learning how structure and reactivity are interrelated. Students will be able to describe reactivity in terms of addition, elimination, and substitution. Biological compounds discussed in the course include the structure and reactivity of carbohydrates and polysaccharides followed by amino acids and proteins. The final topic for the course is a discussion about industrially important polymers. Prerequisites: MAT-261, CHM-115, and CHM-115L. Co-requisite: CHM-235. 

CHM-315҂: 

Analytical Chemistry 

3 credits 

This course introduces advanced principles and theory of quantitative analysis, including stoichiometry, equilibria, photometric methods, electrochemistry, separation processes, statistical data analysis, and applications to advanced topics in analytical chemistry. Sampling strategies and sample preparation for analysis will also be discussed. Prerequisite: CHM-235, CHM-235L or CHM-231, CHM-231L. Co-Requisite: CHM-315L. 

CHM-315L҂: 

Analytical Chemistry Lab 

1 credits 

This course will discuss the fundamental principles of analytical chemistry. Topics will include sampling strategies, sample preparations and analysis, instrument operation, data collection and statistical analysis, and presentation of results. Prerequisites: CHM-235 and CHM-235L or CHM-231 and CHM-231L. Co-Requisite: CHM-315. 

CHM-331: 

Organic Chemistry I 

3 credits 

This course is the first of two organic chemistry courses. The first half of this course develops the vocabulary and concepts of chemical bonding, chemical structure, acid-base principles, and nomenclature needed to understand properties and reactions of organic compounds. The second half of this course discusses chemical reactions, including radical reactions, substitution and elimination reactions, and synthesis and reactions of alkenes. Students learn how to predict reaction products and draw reaction mechanisms. Organic synthesis and structural determination are also covered. Instruction includes lecture and in-class problem solving. Prerequisite: CHM-115. Co-requisite: CHM-331L. 

 

CHM-331L: 

Organic Chemistry I – Lab 

1 credits 

The laboratory section of CHM-331 reinforces principles learned in the lecture course through various techniques that organic chemists use to synthesize compounds. Students use these techniques throughout the semester. These techniques include determination of melting point, determination of solubility, thin layer chromatography, recrystallization, and distillation. Structural determination using theories discussed in CHM-331 is applied to unknown compounds. Prerequisite: CHM-115L. Co-requisite: CHM-331. 

CHM-332: 

Organic Chemistry II – Lecture 

3 credits 

This course is the second of two organic chemistry courses. The course is organized by common organic functional groups, including alkynes, alcohols, ether, aromatic compounds, ketones and aldehydes, amines, carboxylic acid, and carboxylic acid derivatives. The reactions and properties of each functional group are discussed. Students learn how to predict reaction products, draw reaction mechanisms, and predict physical properties. Instruction includes lecture and in-class problem solving. The final assignment for the course is a paper that describes the synthesis of a popular pharmaceutical agent. Prerequisites: (1) CHM-331 and CHM-331L or 2) CHM-231 and CHM-231L Co-requisite: CHM-332L. 

CHM-332L: 

Organic Chemistry II – Lab 

1 credits 

The laboratory section of CHM-332 supports and extends principles learned in the lecture course. Students carry out various organic syntheses using techniques taught in CHM-332. The experiments include preparation of an alkene from an alcohol, a Grignard reaction, preparation of cinnamaldehyde, nitration of methyl benzoate, synthesis of N-Methyl Prozac, an Aldol reaction, Benzimidizole synthesis, and a Diazonium coupling reaction. Prerequisites: 1) CHM-331 and CHM-331L or 2) CHM-231 and CHM-231L. Co-requisite: CHM-332. 

CHM-333: 

Structure Determination in Organic Chemistry 

4 credits 

This course discusses the theory and application of spectroscopic methods/techniques useful for the determination of the molecular structures of organic molecules. Topics covered include chemical tests for functional group identification and modern instrumental techniques used for structure determination: ultraviolet/visible, infrared, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. The major emphasis of this course is on structure determination by way of interpreting the data (generally in the form of a spectrum or spectra) that each method provides. Prerequisite: CHM-232 & CHM-232L. 

CHM-360҂: 

Principles of Biochemistry 

3 credits 

The course objective is to survey basic biochemical principles, including the composition, structure, and function of proteins, nucleic acids, lipids, and carbohydrates. Important biochemical principles include structure-function correlation, chemical reactivity, kinetics and equilibrium, thermodynamics, membrane structure and function, and metabolic energy pathways. The application of biochemical concepts in the medical field is emphasized. Prerequisites: BIO-181 and BIO-181L, and one of the following combinations: 1) CHM-331 and CHM-331L or 2) CHM-231 and CHM-231L. Co-requisite: CHM-360L. 

 

 

CHM-360L҂: 

Principles of Biochemistry – Lab 

1 credits 

This laboratory course covers modern biochemical laboratory techniques and their theoretical foundations. Topics include methods for protein, nucleic acid, and lipid isolation and characterization; enzyme assays; chromatography; electrophoresis; and representing and manipulating proteins and nucleic acids. Experiments are designed for hands-on experimentation and students acquire practical techniques currently used in biochemistry laboratories. Prerequisites: BIO-181 and BIO-181L, and one of the following combinations: 1) CHM-331 and CHM-331L or 2) CHM-231 and CHM-231L. Co-requisite: CHM-360. 

CHM-365҂: 

Instrumental Analysis 

3 credits 

This course introduces students to the quantitative, qualitative, and instrumental analysis of various sample types. Methods for selecting proper techniques to answer various questions are discussed. Analytical methods for the qualitative and quantitative analyses of sample by gas chromatography, mass spectroscopy, infrared spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, capillary and gel electrophoresis, and ultraviolet and visible spectroscopy are also covered. Other techniques, such as high-pressure liquid chromatography and thin layer chromatography, are discussed as well. Prerequisites: 1) CHM-231 and CHM-231L, or 2) CHM-235 and CHM-235L. Co-Requisite: CHM-365L. 

CHM-365L҂: 

Instrumental Analysis Lab 

1 credits 

The laboratory section of CHM-365 reinforces and expands learning of principles introduced in the lecture course. This course allows students to apply quantitative, qualitative, and instrumental analysis of various sample types. Focus is on the validity of results. Analytical methods for the qualitative and quantitative analyses of sample by gas chromatography, mass spectroscopy, infrared spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, capillary and gel are also covered. Prerequisites: 1) CHM-231 and CHM-231L, or 2) CHM-235 and CHM-235L. Co-Requisite: CHM-365. 

CHM-420Δ: 

Environmental Chemistry 

3 credits 

This writing intensive course focuses on the fundamental chemical principles involved in environmental phenomena and how they are influenced by human actions. Prerequisite: CHM-115. 

CHM-441: 

Physical Chemistry I 

3 credits 

A study of the physical and chemical behavior of substances at the macroscopic and molecular levels. Topics include behavior of single substances and mixtures, thermodynamics, chemical reactions, and equilibria. Prerequisites: CHM-115, CHM-115L, MAT-262, PHY-121 and PHY-121L. Co-Requisite: CHM-441L. 

CHM-441L: 

Physical Chemistry I Lab 

1 credits 

A laboratory course designed to complement and support the principles being learned in CHM-441 lecture. Prerequisites: CHM-115, CHM-115L, MAT-262, PHY-121 and PHY-121L. Co-Requisite: CHM-441. 

 

CHM-444: 

Physical Chemistry II 

3 credits 

This course is a study of the physical and chemical behavior of substances at the molecular level. Topics include quantum chemistry, molecular structure and spectra, molecular reaction dynamics, and statistical mechanics. Prerequisite: CHM-441. Co-Requisite: CHM-444L. 

CHM-444L: 

Physical Chemistry II Lab 

1 credits 

This is a laboratory course designed to complement and support the principles being learned in CHM-444. Prerequisite: CHM-441L. Co-Requisite: CHM-444. 

CHM-448: 

Inorganic Chemistry 

3 credits 

The objective of this course is to provide basic principles and applications of inorganic chemistry. Students will learn about modern atomic structure, structure and bonding in molecules and simple solids, transition metals and coordination chemistry, molecular symmetry, descriptive chemistry of select elements, chemistry of materials, and catalysis. Prerequisites: CHM-444 and CHM-444L. Co-Requisite: CHM-448L. 

CHM-448L: 

Inorganic Chemistry Lab 

1 credits 

The objective of this course is to learn about a variety of methods and techniques in the synthesis, isolation, characterization, and handling of inorganic and organometallic compounds. Students will also learn about proper interpretation of experimental data, and dissemination of experimental results through presentation and writing technical reports. Prerequisites: CHM-444 and CHM-444L. Co-Requisite: CHM-448. 

CHM-451҂: 

Pharmacology I 

4 credits 

This course presents the foundational concepts of pharmacology emphasizing basic mechanisms of drug action. Pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics principles and theories are presented. The course details the development of the current understanding of receptor signal transduction in mammalian systems. The course introduces the molecular biochemistry of receptor structure; mass action considerations governing ligand-receptor binding interactions; molecular pharmacology associated with signal transduction; and specific considerations of receptors as pharmaceutical targets. Following this introduction, a systematic study of the effects of drugs on representative organ systems and disease processes, the mechanisms by which drugs produce their therapeutic and toxic effects, and the factors influencing their absorption, distribution, and biological actions. Prerequisites: CHM-360 and CHM-360L and one of the following combinations: 1) CHM-231 and CHM-231L, or 2) CHM-331 and CHM-331L. 

CHM-452: 

Pharmacology II 

4 credits 

This course is a continuation of Pharmacology I. Concepts and principles learned in the previous course are applied to additional organ systems and disease processes. Topics include cardiovascular drugs, chemotherapeutic drugs, endocrine drugs, and drugs of abuse. Prerequisite: CHM-451. 

 

CHM-460҂: 

Advanced Biochemistry 

3 credits 

This course presents advanced topics in biochemistry, including mechanisms of metabolic and environmental information transfer, cellular signal transduction mechanisms, metabolic pathway interrelationships and regulation, carbohydrate, lipid and nitrogen metabolism, and the cell cycle and regulation. Prerequisites: BIO-205, BIO-205L, CHM-360, and CHM-360L. Co-requisite: CHM-460L. 

CHM-460L҂: 

Advanced Biochemistry Lab 

1 credits 

This hands-on laboratory course is designed to provide a project-based experience utilizing modern biochemical techniques. This course will reinforce proper experimental design and control and will provide students with experience with several biochemical techniques, including DNA, RNA, and protein extraction from tissue and its analysis. This course will reinforce troubleshooting, confounds to analysis, and application of various techniques to reach a target goal. Co-requisite: CHM-460. 

CHM-505: 

Concepts of Medicinal Chemistry 

4 credits 

This focus of the course is the fundamentals of medicinal chemistry. Medicinal chemistry is an organic-chemistry-based discipline that interfaces strongly with the biological and pharmaceutical sciences. The field of medicinal chemistry includes the discovery and preparation of biologically active compounds; the study of their metabolism; the mechanism of action at the molecular level; and the construction of structure-activity relationships. This course includes the process of drug design, the structure and function of macromolecular drug “targets” (receptors, enzymes, nucleic acids), as well as the mechanisms by which drugs interact with their targets. Also, the complexity of human physiology and its effects which on the physical and chemical properties of a drug candidate can influence its absorption, distribution, and metabolism in a human patients will be discussed. Prerequisites: Students should have completed a year of organic chemistry and a course in biochemistry. 

CHM-510: 

Concepts of Physical Chemistry 

4 credits 

The objective of this course is to provide a foundational knowledge on basic principles and applications of physical chemistry. The following topics will be covered: chemical kinetics, chemical equilibrium, and thermodynamics. Additional topics will include applications of physical chemistry principles towards chemical and biological systems including enzymatic reactions; time-dependent chemical and nuclear reactions; electrochemistry; and equilibria related to acids, bases, buffers, and solubility. Prerequisite: Students should have completed a year of general chemistry. 

CHM-515: 

Concepts of Inorganic Chemistry 

4 credits 

The objective of this course is to provide a foundational knowledge on basic principles and applications of inorganic chemistry. The following topics will be covered: modern atomic structure, nomenclature of inorganic compounds, bonding theory, magnetism, periodic trends, and chemical reactivity. Additional topics include fundamentals of organometallic chemistry and transitional element chemistry and their application towards material properties, catalysis, and bioinorganic chemistry. Prerequisite: Students should have completed a year of general chemistry. 

 

 

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