Order Custom Written English (ENG) Coursework

By March 3, 2018Academic Papers

ENG-105Δ: 

English Composition I 

4 credits 

This is a writing-intensive course in writing academic prose, including various types of essays, arguments, and constructions. 

ENG-106Δ: 

English Composition II 

4 credits 

This course explores various types of research writing, with a focus on constructing essays, arguments, and research reports based on primary and secondary sources. A writing intensive course. Prerequisite: ENG-105. 

ENG-130: 

Introduction to Young Adult Literature 

4 credits 

This course delves into critical approaches to literature that are of interest to young adult readers. Themes such as identity, culture, ethnicity, race, values, gender, and censorship are among those explored through close readings and textual analysis of popular and historical fiction, nonfiction, graphic novels, and dystopian literature. 

ENG-135Δ: 

Lifelong Learning Assessment 

4 credits 

This writing intensive course enables qualifying adult learners to translate their real-life learning experiences into credits that can be applied toward general education and elective course requirements. Students who pass this course earn four credits and can earn up to eight additional credits by writing full-length Lifelong Learning Assessment (LLA) papers that are assessed by LLA evaluators. 

ENG-206HNΔ҂: 

The Power of Media: Social and Critical Approaches 

4 credits 

This writing intensive honors course continues the themes of knowledge, argument, and logic from previous honors courses. Students cover effective communication and making sound arguments based on logic and research. Parallel events from history are used as a vehicle to show how communication affects society. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the honors program. 

ENG-240Δ҂: 

Writing for the 21st Century Workplace 

4 credits 

This writing intensive introductory course provides students with experience in typical workplace genres and written communication practices. Emphasizing the roles genres play in organizational communication, this course also provides students with practical, procedural knowledge that will help them adapt their writing to new contexts and audiences. Prerequisite: ENG-105. 

ENG-250: 

Analysis of World Literature 

4 credits 

This course is a study of some diverse works in world literature. It introduces all advanced English course offerings. Students will also be introduced to methods of literary criticism and analysis. All students who plan to major in English should earn a 3.00 or above in this course before taking any upper division English courses. Prerequisites: ENG-105 and ENG-106. 

ENG-260: 

English Literature I 

4 credits 

This course is a survey of English Literature from the Old English period through the Enlightenment. Prerequisite: ENG-250. 

ENG-270҂: 

English Literature II 

4 credits 

This course is a continuation of ENG-260, covering the Romantic period through the Modern period. Prerequisite: ENG-250. 

 

 

ENG-350: 

American Literature I 

4 credits 

This course is a study of outstanding authors, their works, and the literary movements from the Colonial Age through Romanticism (1850). 

ENG-353҂: 

American Literature II 

4 credits 

This course is a survey of realism, naturalism, modernism, and postmodernism in American fiction, drama, and poetry of the 19th and 20th centuries. Prerequisites: ENG-105 and ENG-106 and ENG-250. 

ENG-355҂: 

Multicultural Literature 

4 credits 

This course explores multicultural texts from a variety of genres. Students in this course focus on awareness of diversity in culture and in written expressions by analyzing textual features and cultural/historical context. Prerequisite: ENG-105. 

ENG-356: 

The Short Story 

4 credits 

This course is a study of the short story in English and in translation, its development, the different types, and an analysis of technique. Prerequisite: ENG-250. 

ENG-357: 

Foundational Texts of British Literature 

4 credits 

This course interprets and analyzes important texts of the British tradition from approximately A.D. 500 to 1800. Special attention is paid to the importance of cultural context, close textual analysis, and literary terms and concepts, especially concepts of poetic meter and rhyme. Prerequisite: ENG-105. 

ENG-358: 

Introduction to English Grammar and Linguistics 

4 credits 

This course is a review of basic English syntax, form, and mechanics. It also introduces principles of grammar and linguistics and explores the historical development of English and its variations across social contexts. Prerequisites: Grade of 2.00 or higher in ENG-105 and ENG-106, or satisfactory completion of GCU’s written communication competency. 

ENG-359: 

Transatlantic Literature 

4 credits 

This course explores the literatures and cultural exchange of America and Britain from the Romantic Era to the present day. Students develop an understanding of themes, genres, and literary techniques that inform present-day literary and communicative strategies. Prerequisite: ENG-105. 

ENG-360: 

American Encounter Narratives 

4 credits 

This course explores the earliest American literatures to American Romanticism with an emphasis on narratives of cultural encounter. Students examine representative poetry and prose with attention to themes, rhetoric, and narrative form. Prerequisite: ENG-105. 

 

 

ENG-361: 

The Art and Craft of Creative Writing 

4 credits 

In this course, students explore creative writing through an examination of craft and strategies, readings and discussion, writing across the major genres (poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction), and the editorial process, which includes critiquing and revision. In addition, students consider the application of creative writing techniques to arenas in the professional writing world. 

ENG-365: 

Multi-Media Journalism in the 21st Century 

4 credits 

In this course, students learn to identify news, develop story ideas, conduct research on stories, write in a journalistic style, and report information in a variety of media. 

ENG-381: 

Writing for Advertising and PR 

4 credits 

This course exposes students to the various types of writing tasks utilized by PR and advertising professionals. In addition to enabling students to write with clarity and skill for various media and contexts, this course encourages students to use strategy, creativity, and critical thinking in composing advertising and public relations material. 

ENG-424Δ: 

Literary Movement 

4 credits 

This writing-intensive course surveys the major works and figures of a literary movement, including examining that movement’s historical and cultural contexts. 

ENG-425: 

Major Author 

4 credits 

This course focuses upon the study of the works of a major author, with emphasis on the author’s seminal works and with suitable reference to the author’s biography and other works of merit. 

ENG-450҂: 

Shakespeare 

4 credits 

This course is a study of Shakespeare’s major plays and his development as a dramatist, including some consideration of Shakespeare’s cross-cultural reception. 

ENG-451҂: 

Shakespeare and the History of Drama 

4 credits 

This course explores the history of the dramatic medium through the lens of plays from Ancient Greece to 20th-century Europe, concentrating primarily on the plays and cultural context of William Shakespeare. Prerequisite: ENG-105. 

ENG-456Δ҂: 

Communicating Scientific Ideas to Popular Audiences 

4 credits 

This writing intensive course prepares students to interpret scientific ideas for lay audiences. Drawing from best practices of writers from popular sources such as magazines, news articles, blogs, and other forms of popular writing designed for wide consumption, students learn to convey scientific ideas through various genres for various purposes and audiences. Prerequisite: ENG-105. 

 

 

ENG-460҂: 

The Novel 

4 credits 

This course is a study in the development of the novel focusing primarily on the reading and discussion of 19th and 20th century British and American works. Prerequisites: ENG-105 and ENG-106. 

ENG-466Δ: 

Technical Writing 

4 credits 

This writing-intensive course provides an overview of technical writing and focuses on the production of informative practical texts such as instructions, manuals, and process descriptions. Prerequisite: ENG-105. 

ENG-470: 

Methods for Teaching Writing, Grammar & Linguistics for Secondary Education 

4 credits 

This course is designed to help prospective teachers develop the knowledge and skills needed to teach writing, grammar, and linguistics at the middle and secondary levels. Emphasis is given to teaching methodologies that encourage effective implementation of writing, grammar, and linguistics instruction in middle and secondary English classrooms. Course content is strategically planned to enable students to make informed, context-based decisions about writing and language instruction. Practicum/field experience hours: 15. Fingerprint clearance required. 

ENG-472: 

Methods for Teaching Literature for Secondary Education 

4 credits 

This course is designed to help prospective teachers develop the knowledge and skills needed to teach literature and other texts at the middle and secondary levels. Emphasis is given to teaching methodologies that encourage effective implementation of reading instruction in middle and secondary English classrooms. Course content is strategically planned to enable students to make informed, context-based decisions about instruction of literature and other texts. Practicum/field experience hours: 15. Fingerprint clearance required. 

ENG-477Ω: 

Professional Writing Capstone 

4 credits 

This course critically surveys the broad competencies and understandings covered in the major, critically analyzes ethical issues in the writing professions, considers intersections between worldviews (particularly Christian worldviews) and the rhetorical and communications professions, and facilitates the creation of student portfolios of material and résumés/curriculum vitae. Prerequisites: ENG-381, ENG-365, and ENG-466. 

ENG-503: 

Writing Theory: An Applied Approach to Rhetoric and Composition 

4 credits 

This course provides historical, theoretical, and practical knowledge in rhetoric and writing. By studying classical and modern theories of rhetoric, contemporary theories of writing, and relationships between the two, students develop an understanding of key ways to think about writing today. To that end, this course emphasizes praxis: the relationship between practical and theoretical ways of knowing in the discipline. This course also offers an opportunity to practice rhetorical analysis, which is an important skill that will help students become effective, dynamic writers in their professions of choice. 

ENG-505: 

Critical Practices for Teaching Literature 

4 credits 

This course focuses on techniques and theoretical approaches foundational to teaching literary texts. Techniques include close reading, passage analysis, and mastering critical nomenclature. Critical theories pertinent to contemporary scholarship are explored. 

ENG-506: 

Social and Technological Contexts of Writing 

4 credits 

This course covers theoretical and practical scholarship about the social and technological dimensions of writing practices. At its core, this course explores writing as a situated social and technological act. To that end, students explore important theories of writing and technology that have impacted the discipline. This course demonstrates the relationship between theory and practice by considering how disparate peoples may think about the strategies and agendas embodied in various technologies and the artifacts that they produce. Electronic media are considered, as well as the artifacts individuals and organizations produce with them, such as Internet memes and viral videos. Students apply theories discussed in this course to analyze the sociotechnological contexts that give rise to artifacts from their professions. 

ENG-507: 

Grant Writing 

4 credits 

This course examines the process, purpose, and practicalities of grant writing with emphasis on the electronic nature of current communication between funding foundations and grant seekers. Students will learn about funders and their concerns, the parts of grant proposals, and techniques for successful grant research and writing. The course will culminate in the student’s completion of a grant proposal. 

ENG-508: 

Multimedia Writing: Creating a Campaign for Social Media 

4 credits 

This course introduces learners to writing in various electronic modalities, with the aim of creating a campaign for social media. Informed by current theories of rhetoric and technology, learners create an original social media campaign and design appropriate supporting artifacts, including tweets, status updates, or other language for sharing via social media; supporting video and audio content; infographics; Web pages; and pictures, logos, or other supporting graphics. 

ENG-509: 

Applied Theories of Rhetoric and Organizational Communication 

4 credits 

This course investigates organizational communication practices and how they are informed by contemporary rhetorical theories of ethics, identity, and work. Learners analyze the roles of ethics, constructions of power, difference, and persuasion both within and across organizations, as well as in communication practices that address the ways in which organizations present themselves to the public.