Order Custom Written gender relations for development Assignment

By December 24, 2017Academic Papers

Essay Title

Choose one of the following questions:

Note: you do not have to write the assignment using the region you have been working on if you would like to use other examples but of course it makes sense to do so since you have already invested time in researching your region. 

1.     Using one or more country examples from the region you have been researching, evaluate whether and how aid can promote development.

2.     Is development an “inescapably political process”? Critically discuss this question using one or more country examples from the region you have been researching.

3.     Using one or more country examples from the region you have been researching, critically assess the importance of considering gender relations for development.

Brautigam (2009) The Dragon’s Gift – Prologue pp1-21.pdf
beyond aid: Core Reading

Barder, O. and Talbot, T (2014).  Why Beyond Aid Matters.  Memorandum for the International Development Committee.  CGD, London http://www.cgdev.org/sites/default/files/Why%20Beyond%20Aid%20Matters-%20Submission%20by%20the%20Center%20for%20Global%20Development.pdf (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.

Brautigam, D. (2009). The Dragon’s Gift: The Real Story of China in Africa, OUP Oxford. Available as an eBook via FindIt@Bham. Read the Prologue (pp 1-21): The Changing Face of Chinese Engagement in Africa (and more of the book if you wish!).  Also see the ‘Further Reading’ for more Brautigam publications.

CGD (2015). Commitment to Development Index.  Read the Briefing http://www.cgdev.org/publication/ft/commitment-development-index-2014?callout=1-4 (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. and explore the Index http://www.cgdev.org/initiative/commitment-development-index/index (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site..


aid: Core Reading

 Anderson, M. B., D. Brown, et al. (2012). Time to Listen: Hearing People on the Receiving End of International Aid, CDA. http://cdacollaborative.org/publication/time-to-listen-hearing-people-on-the-receiving-end-of-international-aid/ (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.. Please read chapters 3 and 4.

Riddell, R. (2014). Does Foreign Aid Really Work? Background paper for address to the Australasian Aid and International Development Workshop, Canberra 13th February 2014. http://devpolicy.org/2014-Australasian-Aid-and-International-Development-Policy-Workshop/Roger-Riddell-Background-Paper.pdf (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.

Glennie, J. & Sumner, A. (2014). The $138.5 billion question: When does foreign aid work (and when doesn’t it)? Washington DC: Center for Global Development. http://www.cgdev.org/publication/1385-billion-question-when-does-foreign-aid-work-and-when-doesnt-it?callout=1-1

Gender readings

Cornwall, A. (1997). Men, masculinity and’gender in development’. Gender & Development5(2), 8-13.

Kabeer, N. (2005). Gender equality and women’s empowerment: A critical analysis of the third millennium development goal 1. Gender & Development13(1), 13-24.

Moser, C., & Moser, A. (2005). Gender mainstreaming since Beijing: a review of success and limitations in international institutions. Gender & Development13(2), 11-22.

Gender as a framework for development
Feminist approaches to

development

This includes masculinities!

o

Postcoloniality, feminism, and

development

o

Sexuality and queering approaches

to development
Feminism and development
Like most (all?) critical perspectives, feminist analysis

encourages us to look to the margins

o

Feminism in development theory is concerned not only with

the role of women and girls, but the overall impact of gender

on development policies, practices, and understandings

o

Gender is not only considered a culturally determined

expression that is (problematically) linked to sex, it is also a

way of organising power relations

o

GAD can look at how development impacts and/or excludes

certain masculinities and femininity, and can also look at the

specific instances of men and boys, women

Intersectional feminism and

postcoloniality

o

Intersectionality: individuals experience multiple forms of

oppression and privilege that intersect with and mutually

inform one another

o

The turn to intersectionality is visible in the close partnership

of feminist and postcolonial approaches to development

o

Rather than a temporal shift from colonialism to a time after

colonialism, postcolonialism criticizes the legacies of

colonialism

o

Attempts to destabilise the issues and ideas that underpin

development, which is often unconsciously ethnocentric and

dominated by a western worldview

o

Postcolonial thought and the work of non-white feminists has

exposed the problems of feminist theory in general and

specifically where related to development

Gender in development

practice

o

Microfinance and economic inequality

o

UN Resolution 1325 (2000)

 

“gender

mainstreaming”

o

Sexual and reproductive health

o

Sexual and gender-based violence

(SGBV)

Gender-related Development

Index (GDI

Measures gaps in

human

development

between men and

women

o

Ratio of the

Human

Development

Index

disaggregated by

gender

o

3 aspects: health,

education,

economic

resources

 

 

 

Governance

Beath, A., Christia, F., & Enikolopov, R. (2013). Empowering women through development aid: Evidence from a field experiment in Afghanistan. American Political Science Review107(3), 540-557.

Hafner-Burton, E., & Pollack, M. A. (2002). Mainstreaming gender in global governance. European Journal of International Relations8(3), 339-373.

Aid

Kandiyoti, D. (2007). Old dilemmas or new challenges? The politics of gender and reconstruction in Afghanistan. Development and Change38(2), 169-199.

Ransom, E., & Bain, C. (2011). Gendering agricultural aid: An analysis of whether international development assistance targets women and gender. Gender & Society25(1), 48-74.

Further readings: Governance

Booth, D. and Cammack, D. (2013). From ‘good governance’ to governance that works. In: Governance for development in Africa: Solving collective action problems.  London: Zed Books. http://www.gsdrc.org/document-library/from-good-governance-to-governance-that-works/ (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. and http://www.institutions-africa.org/filestream/20110406-appp-policy-brief-01-governance-for-development-in-africa-building-on-what-works-by-david-booth-april-2011 (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. 

Court, J. 2006. ‘Governance, Development & Aid Effectiveness: A Quick Guide to Complex Relationships’, ODI Briefing Paper, March.

Fukuyama, F. and Levy, B. (2010). Development strategies: Integrating governance and growth (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.. World Bank policy research working paper 5196. Washington D.C.: World Bank.

Grindle, M. 2004. ‘Good Enough Governance: Poverty Reduction and Reform in Developing Countries’, Governance, 17(4): 525-48.

Grindle, M. 2005. ‘Good Enough Governance Revisited: A Report for DFID with reference to the Governance Target Strategy Paper, 2001.’

Hallward-Driemeier, M. and Pritchett, L. (2015). How business is done in the developing world: Deals versus rules (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.. Journal of Economic Perspectives 29 (3), 121-140.

Kelsall, T. (2014). Authoritarianism, democracy and development. DLP state of the art paper 3 (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.. Birmingham, UK: Developmental Leadership Programme (DLP), University of Birmingham.

Leftwich, A. 1993. ‘Governance, Democracy and Development in the Third World’, Third World Quarterly, 14(8):605-624.

Leftwich, A. 2005.. “Politics in Command: Development Studies and the Rediscovery of Social Science.” New Political Economy, 10(4): 573-607

Moore, M. 2001. ‘Political Underdevelopment: What Causes “Bad Governance”’, Public Management Review, 3(3):385-418.

Rodrik, D. (2008).  Second best institutions (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.. American Economic Review 98 (2), 100-104.

UNDP, 2006, ‘Governance for the Future: Democracy and Development in the Least Developed Countries’, United Nations Development Programme and UN Office of the High Representative for the Least Developed Countries, Landlocked Developing Countries and the Small Island Developing States, New York

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