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Sociology (SOC)

SOC-100: Everyday Sociology 4 credits

This course surveys concepts, theories, and methods of applied sociology in everyday life. Emphasis is placed on demonstrating the impact of sociological concepts on human behaviors and interactions in society.

SOC-102: Principles of Sociology 4 credits

This course presents a survey of the concepts, theories, and methods used by sociologists to describe and explain the effects of social structure on human behavior. It emphasizes the understanding and use of the sociological perspective in everyday life.

SOC-220: Social Problems 4 credits

This course provides a survey of the various issues and problems faced by contemporary American society, including crime, drug abuse, sexual variance, poverty, overpopulation, and family relations. Emphasis is placed upon how these problems arise from and are perpetuated by modern social structure.

SOC-315: Cultural Anthropology 4 credits

This course provides a study of the variety of cultures that have developed in human society. Attention is given to preliterate peoples in comparison with contemporary and other cultures. The origin and development of the cultures, their technologies, economies, social organizations, and beliefs are surveyed.

SOC-320҂: Marriage and Family 4 credits

This course is designed as a practical look at marriage and family life with emphasis on understanding social science research on marriage and family life and its present and future applications to the lives of students.

SOC-330: Globalization 4 credits

This course integrates globalization concepts and theory with the social reality of the global world. The course leads the students to understand globalization’s economic, cultural, political, environmental, and social inequality characteristics. Upon completion of the course students gain a definitional and conceptual framework of globalization and its mechanisms. The course places emphasis on the student as a global citizen. Students develop a beginning framework of analysis to engage their global world.

SOC-372: Introduction to Social Work 4 credits

This course provides the foundation for students to understand the profession of social work, the social welfare system, and social service programs. Students examine the theoretical perspectives of social work and social welfare. They evaluate how historical and theoretical perspectives influence social service systems, practice, and programs. In a broad overview, students examine social work ethics, generalist practice, policy analysis and practice, social service programs, and advocacy.

SOC-386∆҂: Human Behavior and the Social 4 credits Environment

This writing intensive course provides the foundation for the generalist practice of social work. It connects theories from a sociological, psychological, and social work perspective with an emphasis on social systems theory. Students examine person- environment interactions through a theoretical framework of critical assessment based on systems and roles. In this course, students apply a variety of theories to current social issues. Through the integration and application of social systems theory, students engage in competency-based skill development for generalist social work practice.

SOC-400Ω: Social Research and Statistics 4 credits

This course provides an explanation of the various methods used by social scientists to find answers to the questions posed by their subject matter, including basic terminology and concepts and practice using methods such as surveys, experiments, field research, and evaluation research, as well as some unobtrusive methods. An introduction to analy

SOC-410҂: Social Inequality and Stratification 4 credits

This course provides an inquiry into the dynamics of hierarchies of power, wealth, and prestige within and among human social systems, with particular attention given to the causes and effects of marked inequality, especially with regard to the foundations and consequences of concentration of political and economic power.

SOC-412: Sociology of Religion 4 credits

This course provides students with a framework to examine religious organizations as a part of a larger social order. It introduces basic concepts in the sociology of religion and briefly surveys the historical and social landscape of religion. The goal of the course is to analyze religious beliefs, practices, and organizations from a sociological perspective, with a primary focus on religion in the contemporary United States.

SOC-415: American Minority Peoples 4 credits

This course provides a study of the various minority groups in the United States and their sociological significance in the history of the nation and current culture. The history and status of American immigration policy are also considered.

SOC-417∆҂: Sociological Theory 4 credits

This writing intensive course is a survey of the major theorists whose works and thoughts have influenced and guided the academic discipline of sociology. The emphasis is placed on the founders of sociological theory from the 19th century but attention is also given to those who followed in their footsteps in the 20th and 21st centuries.

SOC-449: Direct Practice 4 credits

This course introduces the student to the fundamental social work skill of direct practice. The course covers the social work “helping process” as the foundational framework for social work practice. The course teaches basic direct practice skills includingintake, assessment, treatment, evaluation, and termination. The course also exposes students to theory-directed social work practice and cultural competency in interviewing. Prerequisite: SOC-372.

SOC-480Ω: Sociology and Social Work 4 credits Capstone

This course examines the sociological concepts of society and culture through the examination of individuals and their real-life experiences. The course compares and contrasts sociological concepts with knowledge required for graduate school and careers in the field of social work. The course culminates with a student portfolio that demonstrates acquired skills and knowledge. Prerequisites: SOC-372 and SOC-436.

SOC-481Ω: Sociology Capstone 4 credits

This course culminates in the application of program knowledge and skill acquisition of sociological perspectives and analysis as they relate to the various content areas. Students apply theory and practical application strategies as they complete a research project that demonstrates critical thinking, using both Christian worldview, the scientific method, and sociological theory/perspectives about the effects of society upon human social behavior and human social behavior’s impact upon society. Upon course completion, students possess basic skills to engage the social world through a well-developed sociological toolkit.

SOC-500: Social Theory 4 credits

In this course, students analyze the works of the great thinkers within the field of sociology. The three major schools of thought are examined in depth, including classical and modern theories of sociology. Students select sociological topics and engage in comparative analysis of the theories.

SOC-502: Sociology Today 4 credits

This course is designed to provide an overview of the field of sociology, especially for those whose previous exposure to sociology was some time ago. The course examines several major areas of interest to sociologists as well as the theories and types of research that sociologists often use to gain new knowledge in this academic discipline.

SOC-505: Sociology of the Family 4 credits

This course takes a sociocultural perspective on the institution of the family. The role of the family within the functioning of society is examined. The course also compares the institution of the family around the world.

SOC-510: Stratification from Global 4 credits Perspectives

This course examines social stratification within specific countries and around the globe. The course focuses on world poverty, world political order, and social justice on the world stage.

SOC-436∆҂: Stratification and Inequality in a Diverse Society

4 credits

This writing intensive course examines the theoretical, historical, and conceptual frameworks of social stratification and social inequality within the context of class, race and ethnicity, and gender. Students analyze the effect of historical events upon social inequality and the impact of those events on current trends within social institutions. Students examine strategies for change relative to social inequality and marginalization of diverse groups. Upon course completion, students are able to explain and evaluate the effects of social stratification and inequality on class, race and ethnicity, and gender in the United States.

SOC-445: Case Management

4 credits

This course introduces the student to entry-level case management skills. Students identify the various roles and functions of a case manager. A primary focus of this course is the case management process, including how to track and manage a client case load. Through case study analysis, students determine appropriate client assessment techniques and problem-solving strategies. Students explore case manager roles and case management styles in a variety of client populations and nonprofit human service agencies. Students learn to differentiate roles, functions, and styles based on their assessment of the client’s needs and a clear understanding of the agency’s mission, policies, and programs. Prerequisite: SOC-372.

SOC-515: Social Change and Development 4 credits

The course takes a sociohistorical perspective on societal change. An in-depth look at how social movements create or resist social change is provided.

SOC-520: Sociology and Pedagogy in the 4 credits University

This course explores the intersection of sociology and pedagogy in the university setting. Pedagogical theory and elements of sociology are examined. Through pedagogical analysis, students look at the discipline of sociology and build a pedagogy for sociology in the university setting. The course uses an Introduction to Sociology textbook to analyze and scaffold an Introduction to Sociology course.